Menu

Contact us

Write us a message and we will get back to you as soon as possible

Thanks, we will get back to you shortly!

 

Top 6 trends spotted at Salone Del Mobile


By Chase Galliardo, Stylist


Four months into 2019 and already, we have been busy visiting a number of design events, furniture fairs, and trend forecasts, to get a good insight into how this year is going to shape our design choices when it comes to interior decoration. We are now witnessing how some of the trends spotted earlier this year have evolved into a stable feature in the design industry.


This month, we went to one of the biggest design fairs worldwide, the Salone Del Mobile in Milan. This fair is one of the most influential design fairs, hosting more than 370,000 professional visitors each year with tons of brands showcasing their newest designs and their take on the upcoming trends.


Needless to say, this fair is a goldmine of trend data for companies like us, with so many of our clients in the living segment. With fairs like these, we get a chance to see what trends are still trending from earlier predictions and what trends to rule out from our production to make sure our clients stay as current and relevant as possible.


We spent 4 days trend scouting through Milan's busy streets, digging through numerous showrooms scattered around the city and the many stands at the Salone del Mobile, to spot the most recognizable and consistent trends we think will have an impact for our clients throughout 2019.

 

 

The Art of Color


Art and playfulness in interior design have been trending for a while now but it’s developing constantly. We’ve seen the rise of odd shapes and artistic takes on almost every household object, used as décor. We see more of those objects mixed with strong colors infiltrate a lot of collections and showrooms this year. It’s vibrant and playful and it adds a fresh new vibe to the living segment. The mixed colors are mostly used for twisted décor and art pieces but some have made their way to cover actual furniture and larger objects like sofas, cabinets, and wall shelving, bringing back the style of the Memphis movement. It is a stark contrast to the wellness and mindfulness trend but there is a subtle link between the two: To play more and let color around you affect your mind and your mood. It is a trend that is both fun to explore and exciting to see develop in the future.

Our Senses Explored

A few years back, wellness and mindfulness slowly started to become an important part of how designers and brands marketed their products, and this year has definitely been the time for this trend to lead the way for anything related to the lifestyle and living segment. From new design hotels to cars, houses, clothes, furniture etc. The trend is already so established that by now, it could almost be considered a semi-old trend, however, it is still worth mentioning after seeing how many designs are still so heavily influenced by this lifestyle at the Milan design week this year and there is a rise of brands who base their identity around this concept entirely. At the last fair, we noticed a large increase in the use of rough textiles and fabrics used for furniture, rugs, etc. to stimulate our senses and making the use of any fabric-covered furniture a more relaxing and stimulating experience for our senses. This fair was no different, proving the trend a prominent feature in design this year.

Back to Basics

Wooden furniture and household objects were spotted everywhere at the fair. Wood is still a very common material for making furniture, but there is a slight change in how the wood is being used in new designs. Designers are using solid wood only and skipping the use of any other materials completely. Metal screws and plastic caps seem to be all absent and replaced with clever designs to make wooden joints instead. This trend ties in with the ongoing trend of making more sustainable and biodegradable products to protect our environment. Together, these trends are linked to the wellness and mindfulness movement bringing the concept in full circle. Back to natural materials - a clean and healthy environment - a clean and healthy mind. It's a neat goal and hopefully, we will see this movement grow in the future.

Rattan Revisited

After visiting the fair in Stockholm earlier this year, we mentioned how this 70’s trend of using rattan and bamboo in furniture design is back. It is worth mentioning once again, after witnessing the amount of rattan spotted at the fair in Milan. This is far from a Scandinavian trend but many of the European brands at the fair had rattan incorporated in some way in their new collection. Whenever a new trend is introduced, it’s never certain for how long it can sustain its hype before people get bored or fed up by it. This trend, however, is still going strong and is still being used in everything from chairs to sideboards, tables, cabinets, etc. So let this recap be a quick reminder that rattan is going to influence contemporary design in 2019.

Dried Flowers

Dried flowers are still very much alive... in a sense. It is funny to think that something so dry can bring back so much life into an interior space, and for now, dead flowers seem to be an undying trend.


Dried flowers had a good start last year and became huge in interior design at the beginning of 2019. Since we are only a few months into this year, a lot can happen still but with the amount we’ve seen this trend being used for decorating so far, it’s unlikely that this will be replaced any time soon. The only other type of plant used excessively at the fair besides dried flowers were the obvious banana palm leaves. So for now, stick to the earthy color palette of the dried flowers when planning your next catalog or campaign for aw19.

The Rise of Colored Marble and The Use of Maximalism

Marble was one of the dominating materials throughout Milan's design week this year, especially marble with a heavy 80's inspired color scheme and mixed patterns were used more predominantly at most showrooms. It’s an interesting and cool looking trend that will hopefully evolve to become a much more used feature in architectural and interior design in the following seasons. When used right, it can create a dramatic and artistic atmosphere. An easy way to use contemporary visuals as decor.

 

Chase Galliardo

Contact Chase Galliardo for more information